John Nipper Waters

First, I’d like to direct you to the blog and Facebook page for the US National Archives, commonly called NARA.  There are two blog posts of particular interest relating to today’s post.  First is on the fire in St. Louis, and the second is on Donna Judd.  The blog on the fire discusses the time line and a bit about the records it destroyed or damaged and what all happened.  The blog regarding Ms. Judd discusses her work in examining the military records that were damaged.  Of note from the NARA website is that you must be immediate family in order to request more recent records (for those of you more interested and closer related than I).

Today, I want to start a look at the men in the Waters family.  I’ll start with Nip, as John Nipper was called.  This is because I have been told that his records were actually in that fire.  I don’t know if more have been discovered in more recent years but there were at least some missing or destroyed due to the fire.

Nip was born in 1920 to James Benjamin and Willie Odessa Waters.  When he was born, Willie had 4 girls from her previous marriage to Andy Pitts: Lydia Beatrice (who passed away in 1909 at the age of two), Flossie Mae, and twins Edna Earl and Lola Evelyn.  After Andy died in 1913, she married James in 1915.  James and Willie had two boys (Jesse Willard and Jimmy Layvone) before Nip was born in 1920.  Willie would have a grand total of 14 (fourteen!) children with the last being born in 1934.

Nip was born in Ashburn, Turner county, Georgia, but by both the 1930 and 1940 census records he’s listed as living in Vickers, Worth county, Georgia.  September 18, 1941, he enlisted in the Army at the age of 21.  His residence is still listed as Worth county, Georgia, and the place of his enlistment was Fort McPherson in Atlanta, Georgia.  While it’s amusing that the record lists the branch of service as “Immaterial”, it’s interesting to note he was a Warrant Officer.  Obviously surviving the war, he returns home to marry and have children.  1986 records indicate he lived in Arabi.

Sadly, he passed away in 2007 at the age of 87.  Findagrave.com shows him buried at Arabi-Antioch Cemetery with very nice photos of the grave site.  (One photo shows the military marker designating him as “S SGT US ARMY” and “WORLD WAR II” veteran.)  His obituary, also found online, list him as a Purple Heart and Bronze Star recipient.

Stay tuned as we climb this branch of the family tree…  🙂

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“Granpa Daniel”

I think I’ve at least alluded to it previously, but this will likely be as far back as I go in this series of posts on my Worsham/ Wishum line.  (Granted, I may jump back to a few “key” people later, but we’ll see.)  Granpa Daniel is about as far back as I personally can specifically trace via actual documents I have found.  Now, if you look at my tree on Ancestry, that’s a bit different.  A lot of those were snagged from the website of a distant family member who posted his work and subsequent corrections from his book.  So, no, I do no personally have the documentation and am solely going on his work.  The further back, the more guess work I did on some names.   Essentially prior to about 1620 is my own guesswork on this line.  (There’s one exception, but I’ll save that for a later post!)

Daniel Worsham was born about 1814 in Marion county, Georgia, to Daniel B. and Caroline M. (nee Fowler) Worsham.  At some point, he married Alsey Joiner but records to that effect are allusive on my part.  They had nine children, mostly boys but a few girls in the mix.  The oldest was James Monroe “Daniel” Worsham whom I have a picture of from the Civil War.  I originally mistook as as his father, the Granpa Daniel I’m discussing here, which proves that you need to be sure to match up any and all information possible in genealogy.  Then was William “Henry” who was followed by my Granpa Jack.  This is where the first girl comes into play in this family – Harriett Worsham.  Following her was Young Stokes who is also a documented Civil War soldier.  I believe I have found documentation on all four of the oldest brothers as Civil War soldiers with all four having survived the war.  Amazingly, I believe some of them actually survived Gettysburg, but that needs more study to verify.  “Y.S.”, as he’s sometimes listed, is followed by Green Warren, Morres, and sisters Cleopatra & Marzilla.

The 1850 Federal Census places him in Division 57 of Marion county, Georgia.  This record doesn’t list any more in terms of names than him as the head of house.  We find him again in the 1860 Federal Census living in Georgia Militia District 743 of Taylor county, Georgia.  It does list Alsey and the children John, Green, Harriett, Cleopatra (“Cleopartry”), and Marzilla (“Margilla”).  In the 1860s, miscellaneous other documents place Granpa Daniel in Taylor county.  By 1880, we find him in Carsonville, Taylor county, Georgia, but with his son “Stokes” living with him and Alsey.  Presumably the other much younger children are Stokes’ children since they are listed as Granpa Daniel’s grandchildren.  (Stokes’ first wife passed away in 1874 and he didn’t marry his second until 1882.)

Joe Branch wrote the following in 2003: “I don’t know when ggpa Dan went back to Taylor Co but it was some time before 1910, it was said he was setting on the front porch, one evening, and looking way off, said I sure wish I was back in old Taylor co, tonight and sometime after he went back, my grandpa didn’t go to the funeral, but his son, Ambrous, hired some to take him in a T Model Ford abt 1910, said they pushed it most of the way, because of wet clay roads…”  Having driven through Taylor county along Highway 19/41 from Griffin down to Americus, I can see why Granpa Daniel had an affinity for that land and why most of our family never really left the area.

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“Granpa Jack”

Okay, Granpa Jack is the difficult one!!  So here’s what I think I’ve figured out…

This is one part of a photo of both my Granpa Jack and Granpa Jesse.

This is one part of a photo of both my Granpa Jack and Granpa Jesse.

Granpa Jack (John Worsham) was born April 1838 to Daniel and Alsey (Joiner) Worsham.  He is listed as having been born in Georgia from what records seem to say.  In 1850 he is listed as living with Daniel and Alsey in Marion county, Georgia.  1860 finds the family living in Militia District 743, Taylor county, Georgia.  From what I can make of records, he married Elizabeth Johnson on March 7, 1861.  She was his second wife but I have yet to find anything on a first wife.

Let’s look at a couple of things before we get to the Civil War episode of his life.  There are two children listed as living with Granpa Jack and Granma Elizabeth: Orren (1857) and Sissy (1859).  So these children were born before they got married.  So the question now is if they were illegitimate (born out of wedlock) or if they are Granma Elizabeth’s from a prior marriage.  I can’t seem to find documentation either way.  It could also be that the date for the marriage (March 7, 1861).  I think what some are guessing is that these are not he and Granma Elizabeth’s children, thus a first marriage before her.  At this point, any of these are possibilities.

Two of my 3g grandfathers, Jesse Hobby (left) and John "Jack" Worsham (right).

Two of my 3g grandfathers, Jesse Hobby (left) and John “Jack” Worsham (right).

Documenting his time in the Civil War has been very difficult.  Because I have no middle name for him, that adds a difficulty to this.  I think I have narrowed down which unit he was with by process of elimination; however, I’m not sure sure I have proof positive.  I have found documentation on his two older brothers and next youngest: James Monroe “Daniel”, William Henry, John “Jack”, then Young Stokes.  I’ll write more on the documentation I’ve found that I feel pertains to him later.

This is Jesse Hobby, Civil War soldier and father of Lue Hobby.

This is Jesse Hobby, Civil War soldier and father of Lue Hobby.

Above is the photo of Jesse Hobby, my other 3g grandfather in this same line.  His daughter, Eliza Lucretia, is who married Granpa Jack’s son, John.  I definitely have Granpa Jesse as having served in the Civil War and surrendering at Appomatox Court House.  It’s very interesting that the children of these two Civil War Veterans would end up marrying; however, the Hobby and Worsham families did not live too far apart!

1870 found Granpa Jack listed as living in Gatlins, Macon county, Georgia.  The family seemed to have moved by 1880 to Cedar Creek, Taylor county, Georgia.  Per usual, there are no 1890 Federal Census records.  It appears that he married Julia on November 16, 1893.  This is confirmed in the 1900 Federal Census where they are listed as living in “Militia Districts 853, 1071, Howard, Cedar Creek, Taylor, Georgia”.  I do have the 1910 Federal Census showing them as living in  Ideal, Macon county, Georgia with son James Collier.  I have not found him/ them in the 1920 or 1930 Federal Census.  The death date I have is January 15, 1931, for now that’s not documented.  And I haven’t managed to pin down his burial location, thought I have “potentials” from Findagrave.com that I’ll look into.

**If you happen to know where CEDAR CREEK, Taylor county, Georgia, is present day, PLEASE contact me.  I’m curious as to it’s whereabouts.**

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Treasure Chest Thursday

I’m snagging a page out of my friend Liz’s “blog book” and posting on a family treasure I have.

This piece is not necessarily of some great value, but it’s lovely and has a lovely story (I think) of how I came to have it.

cut glass bowl

This is a cut glass bowl that my Tata gave me.  (Tata is what I call my mom’s mother, for those who don’t already know.)  She gave me this as a wedding present in late 2009.  If I remember correctly, she said it was my Gunga’s, her mother.  It’s a fairly shallow dish, even for a candy dish, but is one of the prettiest I’ve seen.  I keep it put away in the box she gave it to me in so as not to have it end up broken.

Now here’s something I would LOVE to find, but fear all are gone or broken…

"Hennie's Antique glass plate of Pres. Grover Cleveland & V. Pres. Thomas A. Hendrick - our ancestor." (Madge Cook Kimbrough)

“Hennie’s Antique glass plate of Pres. Grover Cleveland & V. Pres. Thomas A. Hendrick – our ancestor.” (Madge Cook Kimbrough)

This is a MUCH older photo that Gunga had.  This is a commemorative cut glass plate of President Grover Cleveland and his Vice President Thomas A. Hendricks.  Granma Lila was a Hendricks and evidently someone had traced back that we were related to him.

If anybody knows of one of these in existence, PLEASE let me know!!

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recommended books…

Check out the blog post (by Charles Moore) below for some books that sound VERY intriguing!!

 

Family Deception.

 

Also, check out my list of blogging friends who write on genealogy and family finds.  I created a page on here with a tab at the top, so pop on over and check them out!

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Worsham/ Wishum line… the ladies!

So I realized that I listed the men of the family line, but not the women.  So here goes, the ladies who married the men of the line I’m planning to blog.

 

Thomas Edgar Wishum (1897-1982) married Mary Lizzie (Elizabeth?) Massey

John Collier Worsham  (1872-1940) married Eliza Lucretia Hobby

John “Jack” Worsham (1838-1931) married Elizabeth Johnson (and a Julia, after?)

Daniel Worsham (1814-1891) married Alsey Joiner

Daniel B. Worsham (1791-1835) married Caroline Fowler

David Worsham (1765-1815) married  Martha Smith

Henry Worsham (1740-1795) married Martha Jackson

Charles Worsham II (1687-1735) married Elizabeth Archer

Charles Worsham I (1660-1729) married Mary Beville

John William Worsham (1625-1660) married Elizabeth Littlebery

John William Worsham (1594-1660) married Nancy Bennett

William Worsham (1552-1661) married Susan Taylor

 

I only “think” this is all correct.  Some of the later pieces I just can’t say definitively.  I found the info elsewhere and my not have documentation specifically on these persons.  That said, I do have some.

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Lost and Found – John Wilson

"John Wilson - colored help" is about all I knew, it's all Gunga wrote...

“John Wilson – colored help” is about all I knew, it’s all Gunga wrote…

It’s been several months now since I snagged the boxes and envelopes from my Tata’s apartment.  (Tata is what I call my grandmother, my mom’s mother.)  Heehee… I’m a stinker and still have them, but she doesn’t mind!  Some of them were actually her mother’s, my Gunga.  The one above being amongst those from Gunga herself.  All Gunga had written on it was that his name was John Wilson and he was colored help.  I still would love to find out who his family is.  I would love to share a copy of this with them.  But I still have some investigating to do.

After some work, here’s a few things I’ve managed to deduce… I think?!  This photo appears to be from about 1920- 1930.  The plant in the back is castor bean.  Possibly sold to or used by the local pharmacist, whom Granpapa Elijah Jr happened to be related to.  I managed to find him in some census records and draft cards with a little help.  He was a drayman for Granpapa Elijah Jr’s grocery story, Cochran Grocer, there in Cochran, Georgia.  his birthday appears to be November 15, 1873.  He was married to a Phebe Ann Porter as best I can tell, but I’m not sure the daughter (Lela Verseois Porter) is his and not just hers since the last name is Porter.

I’ll have to comment more if I find more at some point… but PLEASE leave a message or contact me if you have information!!  Thank you…

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