Monthly Archives: July 2013

Thankful Thursday… Liz talks friends…

So, I think I’ve introduced you to my friend Liz.  Another genealogy enthusiast and blogger.  She posted a very sweet blog that I heartily agree with… since I’m one of the other members of that group.  So, I thought I’d “repost” and echo her sentiments.

It really is an amazing group that I have truly enjoyed getting to know since we got it off the ground.  Liz mentions the escapades researching to solve mysteries.  (We even came up with a new term… forensic genealogy!)  One of the other things this group is great about is the enthusiasm and supportive personality it’s taken on.  The support, encouragement, and inspiration among the members is exactly what you want to see in a group.

So as I raise a proverbial glass to this astounding group, know that this group is willing and able to make a run at any brick wall or mystery you have.  I say that to also say that when it comes to questions asking me is as good as asking them!  They are my secret arsenal!!

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“Who Do You Think You Are?”

I am TOTALLY excited about the new season of “Who Do You Think You Are?” starting tomorrow night on TLC!  It’s airing at 9PM Eastern and I’d really encourage you to tune in and see what they find out.  Tomorrow night starts with Kelly Clarkson.  (Psst, I notice the last name Rose and Ohio Civil War record in her preview…  🙂  )  It looks like Christina Applegate is up next.  Check out this article for more names.

So, why do I watch this.  First, because I love following their journey and excited in finding out their own family history.  I know how it excites me to find that one more document or another piece of information.  Second, you learn a bit about our country’s history.  Part of their family history is U.S. history as well.  Why did someone’s grandfather up and move to California? (Was it the gold rush?)  Why did they move one state over?  (Was it a land grant or lottery?)  Part of it is the world history as well.  Not everyone’s family has been here for decades or centuries.  Why did they come?  (My husband’s family were French Huguenots as best we can tell who left and went to Germany and came from there to America.  Religious reasons?)  Another reason is the tricks of the trade.  It’s interesting to see the actual documents they find and to find out what else is out there that I haven’t even run across yet in my searching.  (Did you know about the Salt Lists from the Civil War?  Yep, found Georgia ones with family listed!)

You’d be surprised what they learn and where they go in search of information.  What would YOU like to learn?  Tune in and see if you can find out more from them, too!

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Filed under Ancestry Ace, Getting Started, recommendations, searching, treasures, well-known ancestors

John Robert Larkin Waters

Is that long enough name for you?  Just wait… his father’s is longer!!  🙂

As best I can tell, he was born in 1866 in Randolph county, Alabama to John Larkin Cleveland Payne and Mary Elizabeth (nee Lashley) Watters.  In 1880, he’s 14 years old and living with his parents in Morrisons, Randolph county, Alabama.  His father is listed as having been bed ridden for two years and his mother is keeping house.  His older sister, Mary Ellen, 16, is “diseased,” what exactly that means is uncertain.  His younger sister Ruthy is 11 and works on the farm with him.  They have even younger siblings at home as well: Catherine, Joseph P., Hammet M., and George L.

By May of 1884, John Robert is living in Worth county, Georgia, and marries Miss Fanny L. Goodman.  He states on the 1900 Census that he can not read or write; however, Fanny can.  They’re living in Militia District 1121 of Worth county at the time.  They have six children living with them: William A., Cora L., James B., Lizzie I., Ella M., and Johnie L.

John Robert passes away sometime after this census but before the 1910 census.  In 1910, Fanny has married Elbert Youngblood and are listed as having been married for one year, this being her second marriage and his first.  There’s a daughter, Myrtle, who is listed as 8 years old.  With her last name listed as Waters, it stands to reason that John Robert must have died prior to 1909 but after 1902.

I think that at least the death date for John Robert Larkin is mistaken for who I believe is an uncle that lived next door to them at one point.

I think that at least the death date for John Robert Larkin is mistaken for who I believe is an uncle that lived next door to them at one point.

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James Benjamin Waters

“When James Benjamin Waters was born on October 14, 1891, in Georgia, his father, John, was 25 and his mother, Fanny, was 21. He married Willie Odessa Nipper in December 1915 in Turner, Georgia. They had 10 children in 17 years. He died on April 28, 1950, in Crisp, Georgia, at the age of 58, and was buried in Arabi, Georgia.” – from Ancestry.com, via Story View

One of the new features on Ancestry.com that I’m loving is the Story View.  Once you have a person’s name and everything else entered and linked, you can click on the “Story View” button and it will create a timeline utilizing the photos and documents that are there.  **NOTE**  I’ve been told that not everyone has this feature yet, but that it is coming soon!!  It’s located in the top box of your person’s profile right under the birth and death location and is green.  (It’s beside the “Edit this person” button.)

Records that I’ve seen don’t seem to indicate specifically where he was born; however, it’s pretty safe to assume it was Worth county, Georgia since records to indicate at least in Georgia.  A birth date of 1891 is a blessing in disguise with the Federal Census records from 1890 having been destroyed.  This means that the first one he would show up in would be the 1900 one.  In fact he does!  He’s listed as living with his parents (John and Fanny), two older siblings (William and Cora), and three younger (Lizzie, Ella, and Johnie) in Militia District 1121, Worth county, Georgia.  The 1910 Federal census finds something fascinating.  It appears that by that time Fanny was married to Elbert Youngblood.  The interesting part is that James is listed next door as “Ben”and living with his grandfather (Gus Youngblood).  This wouldn’t have been too uncommon, but is still interesting to note and reinforces the need to view all the names and information on a record page!

He married Willie Odessa in 1915 and had one child prior to June of 1917 when he registered for the draft (World War I).  His draft card lists “wife and 4 children”, which would be Willie Odessa, their son, and her three girls with Andy Pitts.  (Remember, one passed away at the age of two.)  The card says he lived in Ashburn and was a farmer.  The Registrar gives a glimpse at what he looked like by describing him as having medium height, medium build, blue eyes, and dark brown hair.

I haven’t located the 1920 census records for him, but did find him living in Vickers, Turner county, Georgia in 1930.  Those records list him and Willie (or “Millie” as it was transcribed) as having six children with them at the time, one being Nip.  In the 1940 Census, we find “J.B.” and “Odessa” living in Vickers still with 5 children and their grandchild.  I’m not sure who’s child since the last name is listed as Waters but is crossed out.  (I also haven’t investigated the matter as of yet… will update later!!)  James passed away April 28, 1950 in Crisp county, Georgia.  He’s buried amongst family at Zion Hope Cemetery.

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John Nipper Waters

First, I’d like to direct you to the blog and Facebook page for the US National Archives, commonly called NARA.  There are two blog posts of particular interest relating to today’s post.  First is on the fire in St. Louis, and the second is on Donna Judd.  The blog on the fire discusses the time line and a bit about the records it destroyed or damaged and what all happened.  The blog regarding Ms. Judd discusses her work in examining the military records that were damaged.  Of note from the NARA website is that you must be immediate family in order to request more recent records (for those of you more interested and closer related than I).

Today, I want to start a look at the men in the Waters family.  I’ll start with Nip, as John Nipper was called.  This is because I have been told that his records were actually in that fire.  I don’t know if more have been discovered in more recent years but there were at least some missing or destroyed due to the fire.

Nip was born in 1920 to James Benjamin and Willie Odessa Waters.  When he was born, Willie had 4 girls from her previous marriage to Andy Pitts: Lydia Beatrice (who passed away in 1909 at the age of two), Flossie Mae, and twins Edna Earl and Lola Evelyn.  After Andy died in 1913, she married James in 1915.  James and Willie had two boys (Jesse Willard and Jimmy Layvone) before Nip was born in 1920.  Willie would have a grand total of 14 (fourteen!) children with the last being born in 1934.

Nip was born in Ashburn, Turner county, Georgia, but by both the 1930 and 1940 census records he’s listed as living in Vickers, Worth county, Georgia.  September 18, 1941, he enlisted in the Army at the age of 21.  His residence is still listed as Worth county, Georgia, and the place of his enlistment was Fort McPherson in Atlanta, Georgia.  While it’s amusing that the record lists the branch of service as “Immaterial”, it’s interesting to note he was a Warrant Officer.  Obviously surviving the war, he returns home to marry and have children.  1986 records indicate he lived in Arabi.

Sadly, he passed away in 2007 at the age of 87.  Findagrave.com shows him buried at Arabi-Antioch Cemetery with very nice photos of the grave site.  (One photo shows the military marker designating him as “S SGT US ARMY” and “WORLD WAR II” veteran.)  His obituary, also found online, list him as a Purple Heart and Bronze Star recipient.

Stay tuned as we climb this branch of the family tree…  🙂

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“Granpa Daniel”

I think I’ve at least alluded to it previously, but this will likely be as far back as I go in this series of posts on my Worsham/ Wishum line.  (Granted, I may jump back to a few “key” people later, but we’ll see.)  Granpa Daniel is about as far back as I personally can specifically trace via actual documents I have found.  Now, if you look at my tree on Ancestry, that’s a bit different.  A lot of those were snagged from the website of a distant family member who posted his work and subsequent corrections from his book.  So, no, I do no personally have the documentation and am solely going on his work.  The further back, the more guess work I did on some names.   Essentially prior to about 1620 is my own guesswork on this line.  (There’s one exception, but I’ll save that for a later post!)

Daniel Worsham was born about 1814 in Marion county, Georgia, to Daniel B. and Caroline M. (nee Fowler) Worsham.  At some point, he married Alsey Joiner but records to that effect are allusive on my part.  They had nine children, mostly boys but a few girls in the mix.  The oldest was James Monroe “Daniel” Worsham whom I have a picture of from the Civil War.  I originally mistook as as his father, the Granpa Daniel I’m discussing here, which proves that you need to be sure to match up any and all information possible in genealogy.  Then was William “Henry” who was followed by my Granpa Jack.  This is where the first girl comes into play in this family – Harriett Worsham.  Following her was Young Stokes who is also a documented Civil War soldier.  I believe I have found documentation on all four of the oldest brothers as Civil War soldiers with all four having survived the war.  Amazingly, I believe some of them actually survived Gettysburg, but that needs more study to verify.  “Y.S.”, as he’s sometimes listed, is followed by Green Warren, Morres, and sisters Cleopatra & Marzilla.

The 1850 Federal Census places him in Division 57 of Marion county, Georgia.  This record doesn’t list any more in terms of names than him as the head of house.  We find him again in the 1860 Federal Census living in Georgia Militia District 743 of Taylor county, Georgia.  It does list Alsey and the children John, Green, Harriett, Cleopatra (“Cleopartry”), and Marzilla (“Margilla”).  In the 1860s, miscellaneous other documents place Granpa Daniel in Taylor county.  By 1880, we find him in Carsonville, Taylor county, Georgia, but with his son “Stokes” living with him and Alsey.  Presumably the other much younger children are Stokes’ children since they are listed as Granpa Daniel’s grandchildren.  (Stokes’ first wife passed away in 1874 and he didn’t marry his second until 1882.)

Joe Branch wrote the following in 2003: “I don’t know when ggpa Dan went back to Taylor Co but it was some time before 1910, it was said he was setting on the front porch, one evening, and looking way off, said I sure wish I was back in old Taylor co, tonight and sometime after he went back, my grandpa didn’t go to the funeral, but his son, Ambrous, hired some to take him in a T Model Ford abt 1910, said they pushed it most of the way, because of wet clay roads…”  Having driven through Taylor county along Highway 19/41 from Griffin down to Americus, I can see why Granpa Daniel had an affinity for that land and why most of our family never really left the area.

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