Surprise and Love

I’m going to combine two weeks with this post for #52ancestors. This will get me caught up! Also, I’m not sure I have a lot to say about either topic.

Week 6 – Surprise

I’m not sure there’s been anything too surprising for me. Maybe that’s the surprise? I haven’t found anything that I don’t feel like others have found in researching. One gentleman killed his father-in-law – it’s a story, there are newspaper articles. There’s also a disappearance and discovering the body – again, a story and articles. My DNA results were surprisingly boring as well – just what I’d have thought from what I already knew. *shrugs* I guess I’m just really typical American.

Week 7 – Love

I know one thing I’d love is to visit places my ancestors lived. My Worsham ancestors in Virginia and England. (Okay, I’d love to visit Rhodt, Germany and Rodez, France, too!) I’d also love to find the court records for the two gentlemen’s cases I mentioned above to know more about what happened. And love number three is more information on the bank or grocery store my Cook ancestors owned.

If you’ve done genealogy or any kind of family research, what’s been a surprise or something you’ve loved?

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Libraries!

So I’ve talked about libraries and databases before. But this week I want to share what I love about the ones I frequent!

I LOVE that my local branch of the library is right near by! We can run over on a Saturday to check out books. Internet out? Stop by and use the computers there! I have two routes home from work and one of them makes it actually on my way home.

I live and work in Cobb County, Georgia. The main branch of our libraries is named Switzer. They have what’s called the Georgia Room. That’s the genealogy and family history treasure trove! I recently found a book there on the parish my ancestors lived in just browsing the shelves.

I also LOVE when I can make it to the Georgia Archives! Okay, so technically they’re not a library but they have books and that’s close enough! The ladies in the research room are so nice and helpful. If you’re in the area of Morrow, Georgia, you might want to keep an eye out for any Saturday tours coming up. They had them once a month this past year for their anniversary and they were incredibly interesting. This year, I think they’re moving to just quarterly. Definitely check them out online! They have a Facebook page AND Virtual Vault.

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I’d like to meet…

So #52Ancestors challenge, week 4. I’m not sure who I’d want to meet. Not without just saying all of them! I probably have a question I want to ask any one of them if I had the chance.

This is some of Grandma Lizzie's Powell family.  Her parents are in the top right.
This is some of Grandma Lizzie’s Powell family. Her parents are in the top right.

So I guess I’d want to start with my great grandparents – Thomas Edgar Wishum (“Granddaddy Buddy” as we called him), Mary Lizzie (probably Mary Elizabeth) Massey (“Grandma Lizzie”), James Benjamin Waters (“Granpa Waters”), Willie Odessa Nipper (“Grandma Dessa”), Harry Thomas Stone (“Granpa Harry”), Eunice Irene McDonald (“Nana” as we called her), Toombs Haywood Kimbrough (“Granpa Toombs”), Madge Elizabeth Cook (“Gunga” as we called her), and Una Bollinger (“Grandma Una”).

Granpa John, Granma Lou, and their children.  That's Granddaddy Buddy in the middle.
Granpa John, Granma Lou, and their children. That’s Granddaddy Buddy in the middle.

Of all of those, I only met Granddaddy Buddy, Nana, and Gunga. I only met Granddaddy Buddy a time or two since he passed away when I was young. But I knew Gunga and Nana fairly well.

Granddaddy Buddy and Grandma Lizzie.
Granddaddy Buddy and Grandma Lizzie.

I’d want to know what my grandparents were like. What were their own lives like as well? What about their parents?

"Papa, Mama, Nip, Grandmother Nipper"
“Papa, Mama, Nip, Grandmother Nipper”

Yep, start with them and work back meeting and getting to know them all! Oh the stories I’m sure they’d tell!

Granpa Toombs and Tata.
Granpa Toombs and Tata.

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Filed under 52 ancestors, Ancestry Ace, Bollinger, Cook, Kimbrough, Massey, McDonald, Nipper, remembering, Stone, treasures, Waters, Wishum

Unusual Name

Week 3 of the 52 Ancestors challenge is an unusual name. Eliza Lucretia is probably the most interesting or unusual name I have in my tree.

Eliza Lucretia (“Lu” or “Lue”, Grandma Lu to me) Hobby is the daughter of Jesse Hobby and Eliza Amanda Simpson. She was born in Colquitt county, Georgia on February 9, 1877 and died in Worth county, Georgia on September 9, 1922. I managed to find her in every Federal Census for when she was living with the exception of the 1890 one that burned. I’d likely find that she lived in roughly the same area her whole life if I research the few counties, their histories, as well as the militia districts and towns she’s listed as living in.

Grandma Lu married John Collier Worsham sometime in 1895. Grandpa John’s parents were John “Jack” and Elizabeth (Johnson) Worsham. Grandma Lu and Granpa John’s fathers (Jesse and Jack, respectively) both fought in the Civil War as best I can tell – but that’s another story for another post. I do have a photo of them both together that’s also been edited to show them individually. (What I’ve posted below is not a very clear version.)

I think it’s Granpa Jesse on the left and Granpa Jack on the right.

Grandma Lu and Grandpa John, great great grandparents, had twelve children that I can find record of – which is plenty! Most of them were boys, including Thomas Edgar (“Granddaddy Buddy” as we called him), my great grandfather.

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Challenge

So week 2 of #52ancestors with Amy Johnson Crow is on a challenge – or I guess challenges. Mine was an easy decision! I’ve written on him before, so feel free to “click pause” here and read what I wrote before about Granpa Jack.

So let me explain the challenge I’ve found with Granpa Jack. Namely, I can verify his Civil War involvement. By process of elimination, I think I’ve found the one that’s him in records (like from Fold3, etc.), but nothing outright tells me it’s him. There’s no wife, parent, or brother listed in the records for the Civil War that I can find. Now, I’ve been able to eliminate some of the others when I search for John Worsham by items I see in their records.

I’d have to double check again, but I think I found Civil War Pension records for him that do give enough information to believe it’s him. The problem with that is that I don’t think it actually says his unit, etc. This is probably what led me to the “process of elimination” I did.

The ladies at the Georgia State Archives research room are fantastic! One of the nice ladies introduced me to the Salt List. That’s the list of those who received salt during the war. Salt was still important in those days for preservation and probably other things we’ve forgotten since then. We found two ladies that were listed together that appear to be the wives of my Granpa Jack and his father. The challenge with this remains the same – little way to confirm the identity in order to confirm a match.

This is Granpa Jesse.

I need to look into his Civil War records more and verify them as well. At least I have him pretty well figured out – so long as I or others don’t confuse him with the OTHER Jesse Hobby in the Worth county area!

Back in September, I visited Chickamauga Battlefield. I saw a familiar Georgia unit mentioned and scurried back to the gift shop to find the book I saw that I own – Remembering Georgia’s Confederates. I knew it had this picture in it.

See that unit listed at the bottom, handwritten. That unit fought at Chickamauga and I either hadn’t ever known or forgot! I didn’t find the marker or anything while we were there but it brought on another challenge for myself before I visit any other Civil War sites.

I need to challenge myself to create a list compiling who I know was in what unit and where that unit fought before I go to any more Civil War battlefields or sites. Especially seeing as how I LIVE NEAR Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield!

So what are your genealogy challenges? What’s your challenge to yourself?

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First

So I don’t normally do long challenges like #52ancestors with Amy Johnson Crow but I’ve really been wanting to write more on genealogy – well, write in general.  These won’t be long but I intend to do all 52 – hopefully in the same week!

So my first I thought of was finding my grandparents in the 1940 census!  I can’t remember which one but I managed to find Grandmama, Granddaddy, and Tata – all three – before it was even indexed!  I was fortunate to know where they would have been in 1940 so it just meant going through some pages one by one.  Also fortunately, they lived in small towns so it wasn’t too many pages!  I also managed to find other family in nearby pages, so now I try to check at least a page or two before and after “the one”.  (So that’s my tip of the day, look at nearby pages even if you find “the one”!)

The 1950 Federal Census will be released in April of 2022.  If you look at the calendar online, it could be either Friday the 1st or Monday the 4th.  (And all the genealogists are praying for that Friday!)

So what’s a genealogy first for you?

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Let’s talk libraries and databases!

After a wonderful genealogy/ DNA friend helped me refind something again, I thought it might be wise to share some things I learned from this whole scenario!

#1  Save your work!  Document what you find.  Email it to yourself.  Print it out.  Don’t depend on being able to remember that you found and where you found it.  (And keep track of where you look for items – make a list/ log.)

This is the big mistake I made!  I thought I’d be able to find it again.  Ooops!  Nope.  I think the database subscription from whichever access I was using didn’t renew its subscription?  Either way, I had to have help re-finding it and the database it was in!

#2  Use the library!  Your public library has FREE access to LOTS of stuff!  Books, databases, computers (to access said databases among other things).  Library cards are free as best I know and you’re likely not far from one whether you drive or not.  And if you have a computer/ internet access at home or work, you can use that card to access the card catalog, databases, and your library account (put books on hold, renew checkouts) from places outside the actual library walls.

I live in Cobb County.  I already had a library card from the Cobb County Public Library System (http://www.cobbcat.org/) and knew about accessing the databases in GALILEO from home since I work at a college and have access via work as well.  GALILEO (http://www.galileo.usg.edu/library/cobbcat/search/) is Cobb County Libraries database access system.  It’s like an online reference room of sorts and makes a great companion to the online card catalog.  Most libraries are going to have this type of access whether they’re county, regional, or state libraries.  I think librarians realize how much we like to access data and information digitally and work to make that happen and to add to the availability as much as possible.

I’m pretty sure that I’ve been underestimating the public library system here in Georgia?!  It turns out there’s ANOTHER library that’s just as close as my usual branch that’s on my way home from work!  And it might actually be close!  So check for other branches or library systems, especially if you live near a county line.  I’m not far from this library system – http://www.wgrl.net/.  You might have to ask about this or do some ingenious Googling, but there might be options available!  It wouldn’t hurt to ask a librarian if there’s anything cool you should know about their branch, system, neighboring branches or systems, or just libraries in the state in general.

Part of what makes this a cool option and find is something my grandmother actually told me about years ago.  Both of them are retired from working at the library, but it’s my dad’s mom that I used to go to work at the library with and mentioned PINES from (http://pines.georgialibraries.org/about).  For me and others like me, getting a PINES library card works IN ADDITION to my regular library card.  It’s another option with more access as far as I can tell.  (WHY am I just now looking into this?!)  This at least gives me easy access to a whole nother library system as if it were my home one – as well as on the road across the state!

So those are my finds and tips from yesterday.  What’s your big find from your library?  Any cool programs?  What about neat databases or access?  Or is yours just gorgeous and phenomenal?

I’ll be back later to talk about the Georgia Room at the main branch for Cobb County, the Switzer Branch!  (http://www.cobbcat.org/research/local-history/)

 

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